• How to make your Black Friday a little greener

    How to make your Black Friday a little greener

    0 comments / Posted by Guest Blogger

    Everyone loves a good deal, and for many, that means Black Friday is the big day. But it’s also a good time to take a closer look at our purchases before clicking the buy button or handing our credit card over to the person behind the register.  Wouldn’t it be smart – and better for us and our planet – to assess the items we’re about to buy and look at them with a healthier and more sustainable lens? Here are a few ways you can make your Black Friday a little greener this year.

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  • Our Ingredients: Sustainably sourced, certified organic, and carefully harvested

    Our Ingredients: Sustainably sourced, certified organic, and carefully harvested

    0 comments / Posted by Brand Blogger

    Our Process

    Nature provides the means to keep your skin healthy, happy, and beautiful. There is no need to use synthetic substitutes that can potentially harm both your body and the environment. We take great pride in using the highest quality ingredients possible in our formulations. To achieve this, we are present in every step of the process. Our ingredients, including Alfalfa, Chamomile, Echinacea, Nettle, Red Clover and a variety of Botanical Tree Essences are hand selected and harvested throughout the year from forests and farms across various regions of the Pacific Northwest. This harvesting process helps to ensure the use of only the healthiest and highest quality extracts and essences.

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  • Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development releases 2016 Spring Reports

    Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development

    0 comments / Posted by Guest Blogger

    Ottawa, 31 May 2016

    In her 2016 Spring Reports tabled today in Parliament, Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, Julie Gelfand, presents the results of three audits completed since last winter. The Commissioner’s Perspective is also included in the 2016 Spring Reports.

    These reports focused on federal programs that are intended to support the sustainability of Canadian communities, on what the federal government is doing to support long-term efforts to mitigate the effects of severe weather, and on how Health Canada manages risks to human health and safety posed by chemical substances used in cosmetics and household consumer products.

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  • Good Things are Growing in Ontario's Greenbelt

    Good Things are Growing in Ontario's Greenbelt

    0 comments / Posted by Guest Blogger

    More than half the planet's people now live in urban areas. The need to supply food, shelter, fresh water and energy to billions of urban residents is resulting in loss of farmland, forests, wetlands and other ecosystems, as well as the critical ecological services they support, like providing food, clean air and drinking water.

    Almost half of Canada's urban base is on land that only a few generations ago was being farmed. According to Statistics Canada, nearly four million hectares of farmland — an area larger than Vancouver Island — were lost from 1971 to 2011, mostly due to urbanization.

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  • Microbeads are a sign of our plastic consumer madness

    Microbeads are a sign of our plastic consumer madness

    0 comments / Posted by Guest Blogger

    How much are whiter teeth and smoother skin worth to you? Are they worth the water and fish in the Great Lakes? The cormorants that nest along the shore? The coral reefs that provide refuge and habitat for so much ocean life? Are they worth the oceans that give us half the oxygen we breathe, or the myriad other creatures the seas support?

    If you use personal-care products such as exfoliators, body scrubs and toothpastes containing microbeads, those are the costs you could be paying. The tiny bits of plastic — less than five millimetres in diameter, and usually from one-third to one millimetre — are used as scrubbing agents. Now they're turning up everywhere, especially in oceans, lakes and along shorelines. They aren't biodegradable.

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